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Alzheimers – a personal story

 
Old 02-25-2019, 12:44 PM
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Default Alzheimers – a personal story

A bit of personal news if anyone is interested. Longish read. Maybe some of you are going through the same thing (or will go through it) and this info will help.

Save money, guise. For retirement, for fun, for rare GEHs, and for other things. But sometimes life hits you and ***** it all up.

My dad has a pretty advanced stage of Alzheimers. His condition declined very quickly over the last several years. To put in perspective, he was reading, handling finances, eating, walking, using the restroom just like a “normal” person up until late 2016. Over the next couple of years, he stopped reading, understanding what was on TV, and making “mistakes” like not remembering basic things, putting TV remotes in the dishwasher, and even not using the restroom properly (“missing” or going in his pants). In mid-2017 I asked him the question I was dreading, even though I knew the answer already.

“Hey Dad, do you know who I am/who she [my mom] is?”

He didn’t know and couldn’t really communicate clearly who any of us were. He said he was never married and we were “good friends”. While the turning point occurred many months earlier, in my head, that was the day things changed. A couple of weeks after that, pretty much all speech from his end was not understandable. Okay, not too bad right? My mom is retired and can care for him and I live less than 5 minutes away. Over the course of the next few months, the stress on my mom was becoming overwhelming. She would constantly call me crying to come over to help. It was getting to the point where she could not handle him.

Imaging trying to get a physically resistant person to brush his teeth, take a shower, use the restroom, or not touch things. Let me tell you, it is almost impossible. Meanwhile, his strength is that of an average older male (stronger than my mom). Sometimes he would even hit her when frustrated. Soon daily showers would turn to every 2 days, to every 3 days. Then it turned weekly when I had to go there on weekends to literally force him to shower. No matter how strong you are, it isn’t easy taking off someone’s clothes when they don’t want you to.

Let’s get some help and look into in-home care or some assisted living facility. No, too expensive. My mom said she’ll take care of him more. Another month passes and I can see my mom is going to break. At this point, I feel my mom’s well-being, health, stress level, and overall happiness in life is more of a priority than my dad’s and money. It was time to seriously start researching what help was available. My mom would say things like “I don’t care, I want him out of this house”. Sometimes she said a lot worse things. But I understand.

I reached out to Orange County Alzheimers (California) and asked a ton of stupid questions. Apparently there are “placement specialists” which I equate to realtors. They will take you to different care facilities and tour them with you. Once you select one, I’m sure they receive some type of bonus.

Note: Memory Care facilities care for folks who have some sort of memory/neurological/mental condition (not a psych ward), and Assisted Living is for folks who are just older but who can more or less function fine.

Memory Care facilities in my area range from $3,500 to $12,000 per month and they are NOT covered under health insurance. Similar to other government services, you either have to be below the poverty line for them to payor be so wealthy it doesn’t even matter. Sadly, most people are in between and are responsible for the full cost. This cost is also the BASE price. Depending on the level of care needed, there are additional fees on top that can range anywhere from $500-3500. In my specific town, the cheapest one was $8,900/month base. Suffice it to say I told them to expand the search outside my immediate area as well.

The placement specialist helped immensely. I was able to talk through basic finances (what we could afford), what we were looking for, etc. There are a few types of facilities out there.
  • Memory Care only – only handles memory care patients
  • Memory Care & Assisted Living in one – handles both types, in separate areas. More about this later.
  • Personalized Care – More of home environment. Looks like a house and has ~6 patients so you get much more personalized care.
I gave a budget to work with and the placement specialist took us around. I asked her to include a “bad/cheap” place too so I could compare. We went to about 4 places in total. In the end we chose a facility dedicated to memory care. Some of the mixed ones had a security door between so there was less overall space/freedom for people to roam around. My dad would not be able to walk into the assisted living area without an escort and my dad isn’t in a condition to voice his desire to do anything. If you ask him anything (e.g.: are you hungry?) he will always say no. Apparently this is somewhat common with dementia. The home-style personalized care was way too expensive $9-10K plus we wanted my dad to have more freedom to walk around and socialize.

A lot of what I knew of these facilities is what I saw on TV. Scary and institutional/hospital looking. I’m happy to say that many of these are wonderful places so if you’re ever in a similar position, don’t worry.

The “bad/cheap” place was pretty terrible. Dirty, smelly, and even the management didn’t really put much of an effort to show us around. Holes in walls that “we were going to get fixed”, a poor outdoor area that looked like a prison, and “oh we only have 25 patients” when I saw a room of at least 50. We left that place quickly. For reference, that was $2500/month base and was a combo assisted living and memory care facility. For those on MediCal/Medicaid coverage, you’ll likely be put there as they don’t cover much (unless you want to pay additional, but that means you have the means to pay more which means you probably won’t get covered under MediCal/MediCaid anyway).

Once we selected the facility, signed the hundreds of documents, did the required doctor visits, we moved him in. It went better than expected. I thought my dad would be very resistant and try to follow us out, but after distracting him with some food, we were able to leave. In some cases, the facility will tell you not to visit for 3 weeks so they can acclimate to the environment. In our case, they said we could visit anytime.

Stress all gone, right? Nope.

Almost every day the facility would call with something that happened. Maybe he fell and hit his head and was sent to the ER. Maybe he was being aggressive and need additional medication at our cost. Maybe he would try to stick his hands in his pants and grab his feces. It was always something. This would stress my mom out to no end, so after a few calls, I’d just stop telling her about it unless it was urgent. I was being the buffer/tough guy here but I can tell you it wears you down. Every time I saw that number pop up on my phone, my heart sank.

Almost 2 months in now and we’ve been visiting him regularly 1-2 times a week and spending about 2 hours each time. He is taking it better than I expected but his condition is a bit declined. Zero way of understanding him now.

Things getting easy now, right? Nope.

Got a call the other day where he was found in another patient’s room. That patient had bruises on their face. There are no cameras in the room, but one can only assume it was my dad. He was probably confused as to which room was his (it is seriously confusing since they look the same) and saw someone in bed, tried to get them out, and they obviously resisted. Of course due to policy the facility has to call the state, his doctor, the police/fire department, etc. Everything is anonymous but still, it is a headache. In order to show the state that the facility is remedying the situation, my dad now needs 24/7 personalized care for a week. That is $22/hour. That is $528 per day. $3696 per week…on top of the monthly fee we’re paying the facility. It was either that, or they transfer him to a psych ward for a month (also at a similar cost).

You know, you can always say “it’s just money” for most things. But when you get into numbers like that, it doesn't work that way anymore.

I’m very lucky that I structured my parents’ retirement well and set up long term care for my mom (I missed it for my dad sadly) but it still isn’t enough. My mom and I are able to pay, but even so, life can hit you with a ton of bricks just like this and there’s pretty much no other option than to grin and bear it.

Not looking for sympathy here. I’m okay. My mom isn’t, but I’m trying to help her by taking her out (now that she has more freedom) to all the places I can. She’s been handling things much better now which is good but she’s a naturally stressed person so it is a constant battle.

If anyone has specific questions, feel free to ask. I’m happy to answer. I learned a lot during this process, hopefully I can pass some of that down.

Pic from a few weeks ago. Place is nice. 2 acres of space where he can roam around. Doors to the outside are unlocked during the day. He can't leave the facility property of course, but he has free reign everywhere else which is nice. He's 77 years old.




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Old 02-25-2019, 12:49 PM
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Default Re: Alzheimers – a personal story

Your parents are lucky to have a son in your position to provide the love/care/money needed in their age. I'm sad to hear about your Dad man, but in the end...he has you and your Mom by his side. That's more than any amount of money could do for him.

This is one of those things that comes on fast from my experience. I've seen people go downhill in less than a year from it, it's very scary.
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Old 02-25-2019, 12:51 PM
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Default Re: Alzheimers – a personal story

That sucks. My best buddy is going through this with his Mom.

I'd say this is an example of why we need universal health care but I don't want to subject you to hearing from UC Nick and Rico that your Dad chose to get Alzheimer's and needs to buck up.

Best of luck to you man. This **** is heartbreaking.
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Old 02-25-2019, 12:54 PM
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Default Re: Alzheimers – a personal story

I'm so sorry dude. It is a truly terrible disease, I've seen it in my family and I wouldn't wish it upon anyone.

You're doing a great thing in being there for them, taking care to focus on your mom is huge.

I hope things get better as he gets settled/the doctors find something that works best for him.
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Old 02-25-2019, 12:54 PM
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Default Re: Alzheimers – a personal story

So sorry to hear your family's going through this Shamoo, wish you all the best of luck.

My Dad passed unexpectedly about 11 months ago, it hit me really hard and still does...
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Old 02-25-2019, 12:55 PM
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Default Re: Alzheimers – a personal story

Just make sure you take care of yourself first. Kinda like those airplane oxygen mask. You gotta first put yours on to put on others.
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Old 02-25-2019, 01:05 PM
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Default Re: Alzheimers – a personal story

Damn, the way you explained it really put it in perspective how bad it is.

Just some food for thought.

There are facilities that you need a certain amount to get in, and if you run out of money they won’t kick you out. So he could get a divorce, have a couple hundred thousand to get in, and when that money runs out no more money.

Grandmom lived in a nice nursing home that was $9k a month. Ran out of funds in 5 years and lived there for another 5.
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Old 02-25-2019, 01:10 PM
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Default Re: Alzheimers – a personal story

It's a tough situation for sure.

Went through something similar with my dad. He didn't have Alzheimers but something similar - Frontotemporal Degeneration Dementia. Basically progressive memory loss, paired with changes in personality, loss of social inhibitions, eventual loss of speech and interpretation. He passed before he ever lost his speech but he definitely had noticeable memory loss. He never forgot who is family was but he didn't believe that I was married, or remember performing the ceremony (he was a pastor). My mom had died about 25 yrs prior and he would sometimes ask where she was. The disease is hereditary and all his kids have a 50% chance of getting it. There is a test you can get that will show if I carry the gene or not, but I don't think I want to find out.

One thing that made it easier on for us was that he planned ahead and bought Long Term Care insurance, so all of the in-home care and eventually the nursing home care was paid for out of that. I believe the cost of the nursing care was in around $5k/mo for the last year or so. Sounds like your mom is covered that. Hopefully she never needs it.

Nice that you live close by and be there to visit often. Good luck with everything.
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Old 02-25-2019, 01:13 PM
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Default Re: Alzheimers – a personal story

Thanks my dudes.

Originally Posted by usdm420 View Post
This is one of those things that comes on fast from my experience. I've seen people go downhill in less than a year from it, it's very scary.
I'm shocked at how fast his condition was declining. With all the problems he's having with aggression and all that (and it is a terrible thing to say), sometimes my mom and I think it might be better if he got to a state where he wasn't so much of a "burden" on the caregivers. Don't know if I'm saying that right.

Originally Posted by Ross View Post
That sucks. My best buddy is going through this with his Mom.

I'd say this is an example of why we need universal health care but I don't want to subject you to hearing from UC Nick and Rico that your Dad chose to get Alzheimer's and needs to buck up.

Best of luck to you man. This **** is heartbreaking.
Thanks man. Without getting political, do other countries that offer "better" healthcare also cover this type of thing? I can understand your regular doctor visits, but I'm lead to believe this type of living facility is a separate animal.

But if so, you're right. How can people afford this stuff? I directly told this to some of the management there as we were signing this stuff. I said I cannot sustain this (with the added personalized care) and they said "don't worry we always have options". Do you know what those options are? They will take everything from you, every single cent. Take your house, etc until you have nothing left. Then and only then will the government take over.

Originally Posted by b20sedan View Post
So sorry to hear your family's going through this Shamoo, wish you all the best of luck.

My Dad passed unexpectedly about 11 months ago, it hit me really hard and still does...
Thanks man. So sorry about your dad. I've wondered how I would take my parents getting older and ultimately passing away and I sort of prepared myself for it over the years. But I wasn't prepared for Alzheimers. Like you're perfectly healthy, but your mind can't function correctly. My dad could potentially live another 20 years.

Originally Posted by Tennobanzai View Post
Just make sure you take care of yourself first. Kinda like those airplane oxygen mask. You gotta first put yours on to put on others.
Yep, that's what I've been telling my mom. Hope she can relax a little more.

Originally Posted by sflkgjsfndgn View Post
Damn, the way you explained it really put it in perspective how bad it is.

Just some food for thought.

There are facilities that you need a certain amount to get in, and if you run out of money they won’t kick you out. So he could get a divorce, have a couple hundred thousand to get in, and when that money runs out no more money.

Grandmom lived in a nice nursing home that was $9k a month. Ran out of funds in 5 years and lived there for another 5.
I work with a personal friend who is also our financial planner. I heard that my mom and dad could get "divorced" on paper so my dad no longer has assets and his care would be covered. But he said the state/government checks for things like that now and it wouldn't fly.

I ran through a few things in my head like having my dad get a loan and just never pay it back but I'm just being stupid. I guess I'll cross that bridge when I get to it.

EDIT: I re-read your post. Yes, there is a place like that near me. It is almost like buying a house. You spend like $300-500K or whatever and everything is taken care of.
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Old 02-25-2019, 01:30 PM
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Default Re: Alzheimers – a personal story

Op, get your genes tested and hope and pray your fate is not the same as your dad. My grandmother is 100+ and she's doing good, although I have to yell when I talk to her but nothing as you described. when you're in that age bracket it's hope and pray game.
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Old 02-25-2019, 01:37 PM
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Default Re: Alzheimers – a personal story

Did your mom/you ever consider putting him a bit further away to save on costs? Flyover state care style?
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Old 02-25-2019, 01:53 PM
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Originally Posted by kidcool1977 View Post
Op, get your genes tested and hope and pray your fate is not the same as your dad. My grandmother is 100+ and she's doing good, although I have to yell when I talk to her but nothing as you described. when you're in that age bracket it's hope and pray game.
Too scared. And then what? What could I even do?

Originally Posted by Rguy View Post
Did your mom/you ever consider putting him a bit further away to save on costs? Flyover state care style?
No, we did not consider this. We want to be able to visit him on a regular basis. She already thinking anything over a 10 minute drive is very far so I have to drive everywhere.

Maybe it could be an option later on.
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Old 02-25-2019, 02:08 PM
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Default Re: Alzheimers – a personal story

Originally Posted by Rguy View Post
Did your mom/you ever consider putting him a bit further away to save on costs? Flyover state care style?
That sounds like an awesome idea.

I'm gonna see if I can send my kid to Kindergarten in South Carolina to save $$.

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Old 02-25-2019, 02:09 PM
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Default Re: Alzheimers – a personal story

Originally Posted by Ross View Post
That sucks. My best buddy is going through this with his Mom.

I'd say this is an example of why we need universal health care but I don't want to subject you to hearing from UC Nick and Rico that your Dad chose to get Alzheimer's and needs to buck up.

Best of luck to you man. This **** is heartbreaking.
Jesus, dude... You really feel comfortable turning this into a personal attack?

Originally Posted by shamoo View Post
Thanks man. Without getting political, do other countries that offer "better" healthcare also cover this type of thing? I can understand your regular doctor visits, but I'm lead to believe this type of living facility is a separate animal.

But if so, you're right. How can people afford this stuff? I directly told this to some of the management there as we were signing this stuff. I said I cannot sustain this (with the added personalized care) and they said "don't worry we always have options". Do you know what those options are? They will take everything from you, every single cent. Take your house, etc until you have nothing left. Then and only then will the government take over.
I'm very sorry to hear about this, it's heartbreaking. To answer your question (subjectively for now, and I'll dig for data later) I don't believe he'd fare better in a socialized healthcare system for 2 reasons. First, as you're learning, his care is very expensive, and very involved. Social medicine doesn't do well with long term illnesses which require a lot of constant care or expensive treatment, which is why the US does so well with cancer. The second reason is that capitalist medicine leads the way in innovation, treatment, prevention, and cures to disease. Personally, I'd rather see money motivated researchers find a cure and save your dad, and/or possibly you in the future, vs the socialist alternative, as I can all but assure you, it'd look nothing like what your're considering moving him to, and certainly nothing like a cure. He's lucky to have you, and it speaks greatly to your character how you're handling this.
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Old 02-25-2019, 02:10 PM
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Default Re: Alzheimers – a personal story

Who knows with future medical breakthroughs they'd have your genetics in a database and use it for research to find a cure. This is just my bold speculation.

I agree, don't move your dad away to some other facility. It would be best imo to keep him home but have an aide stay with him daily. It's what my sister has for my grandmother
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Old 02-25-2019, 02:11 PM
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Originally Posted by Ross View Post
That sounds like an awesome idea.

I'm gonna see if I can send my kid to Kindergarten in South Carolina to save $$.

this is what I hate about western society. The young just send the old into some facility and never visit.
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Old 02-25-2019, 02:22 PM
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Default Re: Alzheimers – a personal story

I feel you, every bit. We're having to think of something for me mum as well on her health issues. I know you're still thinking about finding something for your wife to do, well how about your mom and your wife grow some microgreens? I'm sure you mom has a green thumb, and not cuz she's asian.
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Old 02-25-2019, 02:24 PM
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Default Re: Alzheimers – a personal story

Originally Posted by kidcool1977 View Post
this is what I hate about western society. The young just send the old into some facility and never visit.
They don't want the ****** responsibility man. Your mom pulled strings, drop your car payments on her cc and used the house to get a loan for your *** and you sit there and only want to play video games and drink beer while having fun . You then dump all that **** on your only sister to handle. Fucked up is that.
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Old 02-25-2019, 02:32 PM
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Default Re: Alzheimers – a personal story

Originally Posted by shamoo View Post
Thanks man. Without getting political, do other countries that offer "better" healthcare also cover this type of thing? I can understand your regular doctor visits, but I'm lead to believe this type of living facility is a separate animal.

But if so, you're right. How can people afford this stuff? I directly told this to some of the management there as we were signing this stuff. I said I cannot sustain this (with the added personalized care) and they said "don't worry we always have options". Do you know what those options are? They will take everything from you, every single cent. Take your house, etc until you have nothing left. Then and only then will the government take over.

My grandma had dementia but passed away before it totally incapacitated her. I have a buddy with a grandfather who has Alzheimer's and just broke his hip last week. Due to the dementia, he has no understanding of the injury, so the doctors have basically given up on having it heal (impossible due to him constantly moving and trying to stand up) and he's now in hospice care. This is terrible, terrible stuff and scares the **** out of me.

As to your question above, here's what I quickly Googled for Sweden:

A challenge for our future

Health and social care for the elderly are important parts of Swedish welfare policy. Of Sweden’s 10 million inhabitants, 20 per cent have passed the standard retirement age of 65. This number is projected to rise to 23 per cent by 2040, partly because of the large number of Swedes born in the 1940s.

Largely funded by taxes

Life expectancy in Sweden is among the highest in the world: 81 years for men and 84 years for women. In Sweden, 5.2 per cent of the population are aged 80, which is slightly more than the EU average of 5.1 per cent. Since more and more citizens in this age group are in good health, their care requirements have declined since the 1980s.

Most elderly care is funded by municipal taxes and government grants. In 2014, the total cost of elderly care in Sweden was SEK 109.2 billion (USD 12.7 billion, EUR 11.7 billion), but only 4 per cent of the cost was financed by patient charges. Healthcare costs paid by the elderly themselves are subsidised and based on specified rate schedules.

Public or private

More municipalities are choosing to privatise parts of their elderly care, letting private care providers run their operations. In 2013, private care provided services for 24 per cent of all elderly people getting home help. All recipients can choose whether they want their home help or special housing to be provided by public or private operators. The municipality always has overall responsibility, however, for areas such as funding and allocating home help or a place in a special housing facility.

The number of private companies in the social service sector increased fivefold between 1995 and 2005. Media investigations have unearthed alarming shortfalls among several private care companies. In subsequent criticism, the companies were accused of letting profit have a negative impact on the standard of care.

Home help makes life easier

One of the aims of elderly care is to help elderly people and those with disabilities live normal, independent lives. This includes living in their own homes as long as possible.

Elderly people who continue to live at home can obtain various kinds of support to make life easier. For example, almost all municipalities in Sweden offer ready-cooked meals that can be home-delivered.

In 2014, home help staff assisted around 221,600 people aged 65 or over. Almost half of the country’s municipalities also provide communal meals for the elderly at special day centers, while a few organise small groups of elderly people into teams that cook their own meals.

Around the clock

When an elderly person is no longer able to cope with the demands of everyday life, he or she can apply for assistance from municipally funded home-help services. The extent of such care is subject to an assessment of need. Elderly people with disabilities can receive assistance around the clock, which means that many are able to remain at home throughout their lives. The severely ill, too, can be provided with health and social care in their own homes.

Each municipality decides its own rates for elderly care. The cost depends on such factors as the level or type of help provided and the person’s income. The maximum charge for home help, daytime activities and certain other kinds of care is SEK 1,772 per month (2016).

Municipalities offer daytime activities for elderly and disabled people in need of stimulation and rehabilitation. These activities primarily target those with dementia or mental disabilities. Daytime activities help many to continue to live in their homes.

Transportation services

The elderly and disabled also qualify for transportation services in taxis or specially adapted vehicles. This option is available to those who are unable to travel by regular public transport. In 2014, 11 million such journeys were completed across the country, a national average of 35 per eligible person.

The Swedish pension system

All Swedish citizens are entitled to a national retirement pension after they retire. People can choose to start receiving their pension between the ages of 61 and 67.

From 2005 to 2014, the number of working Swedes aged 65–74 increased by as much as 127 per cent. The average retirement age today is 64.5.

There are several different sources that make up a Swedish pension. People who have worked and lived in Sweden will get a national retirement pension based on the income on which they have paid tax. The national retirement pension consists of income pension, premium pension and guarantee pension.

The average national retirement pension in 2014 was SEK 11,093 per month. In addition to the national retirement pension, most people employed in Sweden also get an occupational pension, based on contributions made by their employers.

Altogether, 71 per cent of pensioners’ total income derives from the public pension system. For added security, many choose to supplement their retirement benefits with private pension savings.

Preparations for an ageing population

Like many other countries, Sweden has a growing proportion of elderly people. Elderly care has therefore become increasingly important, and the government has taken steps to meet future challenges in this area.

In 2040, nearly one in four Swedes will be 65 years or older, and most of the people in this age group will be active and healthy. Several initiatives aimed at meeting future needs are now being put in place around the country.
  • In a 2013 report, the government-appointed Commission on the Future identified a series of challenges that Sweden may be confronted with, including the country’s ageing population.
  • To meet the coming demographic challenge without jeopardising welfare levels, people will have to work longer. Another report from 2013 suggests a number of measures enabling people to prolong their working life, such as that the earliest age at which people can draw their old age pension should be raised from 61 to 62 and, later, 63.
  • The government recently invested SEK 4.3 billion in measures to improve health and social care for the most infirm members of the 65+ age group. The aim: to improve coordination of home healthcare, elderly care, hospital care and health-center care provided to elderly people.
So it looks like care is provided either in home or in facilities (that are either public or private) depending on the municipality, with a maximum cost to the patient of SEK 1,772 or $190/mo.

https://sweden.se/society/elderly-care-in-sweden/

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Old 02-25-2019, 03:00 PM
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Default Re: Alzheimers – a personal story

Really sorry to hear this Shamoo, this stuff scares the hell outta me.

My Dad got pneumonia last year, and one of the side effects can be memory loss in older people, so for 2 weeks my dad basically had mild Alzheimers. He couldn't remember what he ate for breakfast, what me and my sisters birthdays were, what show he was watching, he was forgetting all kinds of ****. And he's diabetic so I had to be there constantly to make sure he didn't skip or take his insulin twice. It really freaked me out. He has since gotten better and regained 95% of his memory function but I can tell he is not 100%. It makes me very nervous that he will have full blown dementia at some point. He's 71 now. This thread really hits home.
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Old 02-25-2019, 03:28 PM
  #21  
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Default Re: Alzheimers – a personal story

Originally Posted by shamoo View Post
Too scared. And then what? What could I even do?
.
start planning for the worst is all I can say. if you have kids do you want them in the same situation? I'm terrified about getting older. it apparently runs down both mine and my wifes families. I've seen it on both sides and its ******* scary.

I really hate to say it but my grand father literally got as bad as the dude from the adam sandler movie in hawaii. hi! I'm bob. seconds later...hi! I'm bob!

my wife's grand mother on her fathers side has broken her face like 4 times in the 10 years we've been together just randomly walking around like a toddler in a hallway at the home she's at. she keeps escaping into the yard and tripping over tree roots. just wow.
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Old 02-25-2019, 03:32 PM
  #22  
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Default Re: Alzheimers – a personal story

My condolences man


I have seen a few slowly deteriorate because of this
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Old 02-25-2019, 03:36 PM
  #23  
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Default Re: Alzheimers – a personal story

Damn, some of ya'll have bad genetics. Sheesh.

In my family tree, the elderly seems fine besides your typical cataracts, glaucoma, I think some diabetes. Can't recall anyone saying grandpa bob lost his memory. On my dads side he had grandmother that lived 100+. Think my dad is in his 70s now and he might be doing good (never see him).

If it makes ya'll feel better I know i'll be blind in due time.

Who knows maybe CRISPR will solve these problems in the coming years.
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Old 02-25-2019, 03:42 PM
  #24  
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Default Re: Alzheimers – a personal story

Originally Posted by kidcool1977 View Post
Damn, some of ya'll have bad genetics. Sheesh.

In my family tree, the elderly seems fine besides your typical cataracts, glaucoma, I think some diabetes. Can't recall anyone saying grandpa bob lost his memory. On my dads side he had grandmother that lived 100+. Think my dad is in his 70s now and he might be doing good (never see him).

If it makes ya'll feel better I know i'll be blind in due time.

Who knows maybe CRISPR will solve these problems in the coming years.



Alzheimer’s is not in my family tree but HTN and prostate cancer are the killers in my family.


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Old 02-25-2019, 03:44 PM
  #25  
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Default Re: Alzheimers – a personal story

Originally Posted by Ross View Post
That sounds like an awesome idea.

I'm gonna see if I can send my kid to Kindergarten in South Carolina to save $$.

You know what I meant. An hour away could lower the price immensely and is totally within an easy stroll of a drive.
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