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***High-Performance Cooling System***

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Old 06-05-2012, 05:09 AM   #1
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Default ***High-Performance Cooling System***

Hi There H-T Family,

This is To maximize our knowledge.

Lets talk about Cooling Systems.

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Global warming?
While the tree- huggers clamor over ex-Vice President Gore's global temperature scare, we'll lay odds that when summer arrives, car crafters will be more concerned about engine warming or, more accurately, engine overheating. Cooling systems are often the last item on the "let's get it running" checklist. Unfortunately, radiators and cooling-system components qualify for afterthought status until there's a problem. Most of the time, modified cars tend to have problems with cooling.

How Cool Do You Have To Be?
There are three basic parameters that determine cooling efficiency: radiator surface area, coolant speed through the system, and the amount of airflow through the radiator. These three functions determine the efficiency of the system as expressed in Btu of heat rejection per minute. Even a small problem with any of these variables will cause difficulties. Since this is a rather complex situation with dozens of variables, we're going to just hit the high spots on how to make your cooling system more efficient.

The biggest limitation in terms of radiator surface area is the original vehicle itself. The radiator core support generally dictates the size of the radiator, along with the displacement of the engine and the horsepower it makes. Core support and engine size are obvious, but there is some voodoo science related to the horsepower number. Let's say your car makes 1,000 hp at 6,000 rpm. It'll create a certain amount of heat at that power peak, but you are going to spend most of your idling around the pits or on the way to the grocery store. At idle, it's likely that you are making less than 20 hp, which doesn't really create a lot of heat. Manufacturers therefore must create a balance where the radiator can be large enough to handle the engine's heat pontential yet still be small enough to fit in the car and be relatively inexpensive.

Radiator Basics
Let's start with radiator materials. Our automotive forefathers were pretty sharp guys and used copper/brass radiators for a reason. Copper has an excellent thermal-conductivity rating. A copper-fin's thermal-conductivity rating is more than 50 percent higher than an aluminum fin. Brass, which is an alloy of copper, is not as good a conductor as aluminum but is used for the tubes because of its strength. One difficulty with copper is that the lead solder used in older copper/brass radiators has a terrible thermal-conductivity rating, which limits the efficiency of lead-soldered radiators. So companies such as U.S. Radiator have instituted a newer process that improves efficiency by changing the flux and solder and its contact with the fins.

If you've ever wondered why some copper/brass radiators are cheaper than others, it's all in the construction. The original radiators built in the musclecar era used 11/42-inch tubes 91/416-inch apart that are generally the least expensive. More modern radiator construction moved those centers closer together, with the 11/42-inch tubes 31/48-inch apart. This creates room for more tubes in the same-size radiator core. There are even copper-brass radiators now with 11/42-inch tubes on 51/416-inch centers. Each of these versions can be obtained in two-, three-, or four-row applications. As the radiators become denser, they become more expensive.


Tubes in all radiators are flattened to increase surface area that contacts the fins. Alum
Then why have aluminum radiators become so popular? One big reason is that the OEMs saw the potential for a significant weight reduction and lower material costs. Racers are also big on aluminum radiators for that reason, with a weight difference of around 10 to 15 pounds. Plus, aluminum radiators start with 1-inch cooling tubes roughly 31/48 inch apart. Fin counts are also a critical radiator-design component, but a higher fin density (measured in fins per inch) may make airflow more difficult and not necessarily work well for street applications.


The two major designs for radiators are vertical flow and horizontal flow. As far as efficiency is concerned, there is no advantage to horizontal-flow radiators other than that they tend to allow a larger core to fit into a given engine compartment. Virtually all production-based radiators are built with a single-pass design, where coolant enters from the engine into the top of the radiator and travels across the core to the outlet on the opposite side. While dual-pass radiators have been around for a long time, they are now beginning to show up in high-performance and racing applications. A dual-pass horizontal-flow radiator moves coolant across the top half of the radiator on the first pass, then directs the coolant across the lower portion of the radiator face for a second pass. One reason this works is because the velocity of the coolant roughly doubles when the coolant is forced to travel across half as many tubes per pass. This creates turbulence in the tubes, exposing more coolant to the radiator tube walls and improving heat transfer. This also presents an increased load to the water pump, which means using a dual-pass radiator demands a better water pump if the system is to take advantage of the dual-pass concept.

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Fabricated aluminum shrouds,
To Get the most Cfm's from your fan i recommend fabricated aluminum or fiber shrouds, which can be ordered either alone or with an electric fan or can be fabricated, The shrouds look very professional.



Radiator Cap Holds Very Important Role In Your Car:

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Radiator cap plays a crucial role in maintaining your vehicle's cooling efficiency. They are to prevent overheating and coolant loss. A faulty cap can result in engine damage and even explosion, so it is important that it is checked periodically and replaced if necessary.

Radiator caps also serve as pressure relief valve to prevent excessive pressure in the cooling system after the engine is turned off. Unchecked high pressure could cause damage to the radiator, heater core, hoses or water pump seal.

The pressure cap also prevents radiator hoses and tanks from collapsing due to the partial vacuum which would be created if air was unable to enter.

Common Radiator Problems And How To Avoid Them

1) Radiator Overheating
When a car overheats, the radiator is the first point of inspection to determine any possible problem. Overheating could be caused by:

low/empty coolant level broken auxiliary fans or malfunction
broken hoses that result in coolant leak – A greenish or bluish fluid leak
broken/damaged or dirty radiator

2) Radiator Corrosion/Rust
Corrosion is another key factor in a failing radiator.Therefore Toyoguard Radiator Caps are only made from Stainless Steel. Corrosion in the radiator can block ports or channels in the radiator that flow from one side to the other. Even if you can look down into the radiator, the corrosion may be at the lower end and out of sight. Running straight water in the radiator will allow scale and minerals to build up, blocking ports. Dirt and mud over the fins of a radiator will have a big impact on overheating.

If your radiator is made of metal , it is susceptible to rust. Try to pop open the hood and remove the radiator cap when the engine is cold. Check for coolant level and color. A brownish fluid would mean excessive rust inside the cooling system and flushing is then recommended. Inspect the radiator cap and the surrounding area for any signs of rust. Have the radiator inspected if excess rust is present.

To prevent rust from accumulating in your radiator, use high quality coolant or anti freeze mixed with adequate amounts of distilled water. Never use tap water to refill your radiator or reservoir. Have the radiator flushed at least once a year to prevent accumulation of rust which will affect the efficiency of your radiator and result to engine overheat.

3) Radiator Leaks
A radiator leak is most often caused by old age and should be repaired/replaced immediately. Accidents could also cause radiator damage and should be inspected thoroughly in the event of a road mishap. Flying stones or rocks in the road may also hit the radiator and cause a harmful leak. This would lead to coolant loss and engine overheat. If any sign of leak is evident on your radiator, have this problem inspected and repaired immediately. If the leak is persistent have the radiator replaced to prevent any problems in the future. Remember to use the right kind of coolant and water to fill your radiator.

It would be a good idea to inspect the condition of your radiator whenever possible or at least once a week. Check your radiator for proper coolant level before taking a long trip and bring along at least a liter of distilled water and coolant to prepare for any road emergency that may arise.

2.Why Its Important To Change Faulty Radiator Cap
The constant over heating eventually spoil the alternator, the water pump bearings and potential engine damage, especially during the hot summer months.

A radiator cap generally contains a spring loaded plunger, It is important to change the cap if the spring does not work properly. This plunger serves two purposes in your cooling system:

Should internal pressures exceed the spring pressure of the plunger, coolant will be diverted to an overflow reservoir. It is important to change the broken Radiator cap because if this simple feature did not exist, pressure would simply continue to build, causing sudden leaks or even explosions as the building pressure desperately tries to find a way to relieve itself.
This spring pressure helps to maintain a specific pressure inside your cooling system. As atmospheric pressure rises, the boiling point of a fluid also rises. Boiling fluid isn’t very good at transferring heat, so by increasing the pressure inside the system, you increase the amount of heat the cooling system can remove before it begins to boil.

3.Diagnosing A Faulty Cap
A faulty radiator cap will show a few common symptoms. If you are overheating and coolant is not moving back and forth between the overflow reservoir and cooling system as pressure dictates, the spring loaded plunger may be stuck or jammed in place.

A cap that is unable to maintain pressure will often show coolant boil at normal operating temperatures. This boiling can be heard quite easily, and witnessed by looking closely at the overflow reservoir. Leaking from around the radiator cap is also a common and easy to notice symptom, but be careful not to confuse this with freshly filled coolant, as slight spillage is common during refills.

4.Replacement Tips
It is extremely important to always make sure to allow the engine to cool down before removing the radiator cap, as removing the cap from a hot system can cause sudden coolant spray and severe burns.
Pay close attention to the pressure rating on your cap, and select one with the same pressure rating. Once you have a replacement and your engine is cool, simply unscrew the old cap, and install the new by screwing it on.
A faulty radiator cap can have a huge impact on the cooling performance of your vehicle. If your coolant is boiling at even normal temperatures, or you seem to be having problems with your coolant moving back and forth between the cooling system and your overflow tank, consider taking a look at your radiator cap.

While a cap may be easy to replace however, it is not a substitute for proper radiator maintenance. Proper coolant changes and cleaning are key components to a healthy cooling system.

5.Understanding Radiator Cap Pressure Rating
Each radiator cap has a specific amount of pressure that it will hold. Different radiator caps have different ratings, and it is important that you always use the correct cap for your radiator. If the cap that you are using for your radiator is not sufficient, it can result in problems with your cooling system. The cap acts as a pressure relief valve. Too much pressure can cause damage, while not enough pressure can cause the engine to overheat.

6.Where To Find The Pressure Rating:
The right portion of Toyoguard radiator cap will list the pressure rating. Always use a cap of the correct pressure for your cooling system. You may find that it is beneficial to test the cap so that you can be sure that it is working properly. If you do not have the equipment to do the radiator cap pressure testing, you can have it done at a Shop.

7.Radiator Cleaning In 8 Easy Steps
What You Need
Distilled water (at least one to two liters depending on radiator capacity)
Engine coolant or antifreeze
Radiator flush
Hose and water source
Heat resistant or water proof hand gloves
Cotton rag or towel
Step 1 - Preparation
Park the car in a well ventilated and well lit area. Make sure that the engine is cool before starting.

Step 2 - Drain Some Coolant
Access the radiator drain valve and slowly remove to drain excess coolant and water from the system. It would be a good idea to drain at least a liter of water from the system. Let the coolant flow and re- tighten the drain valve.

Step 3 - Pour Radiator Flush
Open the radiator cap and pour the entire contents of the radiator flush (at least 250 to 500 ml) inside the radiator. Close the cap and re-tighten.

Step 4 - Start The Engine
Start the engine and let it warm for five to ten minutes. Do not drive or rev the engine. Turn off the engine after reaching ideal operating temperature.

Step 5 - Drain All The Coolant
Now that the coolant inside the radiator is hot, take care when handling various engine components by wearing gloves. Let the engine cool for about five minutes and drain the entire contents of the radiator by again removing the drain valve.

Step 6 - Flush With Water
Open the radiator cap and insert the garden hose. Use a hand towel because the radiator cap may be too hot to touch. Connect the hose to a water supply and let running water pass through the radiator and onto the drain valve. Do this for about five minutes to properly flush the system.

Step 7 - Refill The Radiator
Let excess water drain and tighten the drain valve. Pour fresh coolant and distilled water into the radiator. Close the cap tightly. Check for any leaks on the drain valve before proceeding. A 50/50 ratio of coolant and distilled water is an ideal ratio. Consult your vehicle manual for the right amount and concentration recommended.

Step 8 - Start The Car
Set aside all materials used and start the car. Let it warm to ideal operating temperature and observe for any leaks in the system. Close the hood and drive the car, and observe the temperature needle on the console for any changes that may occur. Stop the car and open the hood again to recheck the system for any leaks. Remember to wipe any excess coolant that may have spilled onto the system. If the engine temperature needle rises above half on the console indicator, consult a qualified mechanic or service center for radiator service and diagnostic procedures.

Coolant Chronicles
What you pour into a radiator is also an important decision if you want to protect all those expensive aluminum engine components. Straight water is the most thermally efficient coolant, but anticorrosion issues and cold weather demand antifreeze. According to Jay Ross at Applied Chemical Specialties, the best water to use is soft water. Distilled water is not a good idea because distillation strips ions from the water. When it is introduced into the cooling system, the natural chemical-balance process will pull the ions from light metals such as aluminum or magnesium that are exposed to the water. This ion transfer greatly enhances the corrosion process called electrolysis. Soft water is treated with sodium chloride that replaces the lost ions and minimizes the electrolysis process. If soft water is not available, then bottled water or tap water is the next best solution. If you insist on distilled water, Ross says mixing it 50/50 with antifreeze will pull ions from the antifreeze rather than from your cooling system itself.


Purple Ice and No-Rosion are excellent anticorrosion additives that can be used with eithe
If you are a drag racer who is required to use straight water, a high-quality anticorrosion additive is essential. We've found the No-Rosion additive from Applied Chemical works very well. A pint of this additive applies a thin anticorrosion layer to the cooling system to fight deposits and limit the effect of electrolysis, yet it does not hurt heat transfer. Royal Purple's Purple Ice is another anticorrosion product that uses additional additives called dispersants to help reduce the formation of steam pockets in the cooling system, which can reduce heat transfer from the combustion chamber, causing detonation and boilover. Additives such as Red Line's Water Wetter and Purple Ice address this by reducing the size of these steam pockets. When steam pockets form, they act as insulators, preventing heat transfer out of the combustion chamber. While it may seem obvious, it's worth noting that these additives will not help a car with problems such as an undersized radiator or insufficient water or airflow. These additives are not a mechanic in a can.

Fan Calculations - Measure Airflow with CFM

With one formula, you can find what fan is right for your home. This is the formula for fan CFM: Cubic feet per minute, more commonly known as CFM is calculated by the following formula: air speed (feet per minute) X area (square feet)=CFM. Not everyone is going to take a look at CFM, but for those who do it is a helpful tool. In simpler words than that of the formula, it is the amount of air a fan moves.

The amount of air depends on some other factors as well, such as the diameter and shape of the blades, speed at which the blades turn (revolutions per minute or rpm), horsepower (hp) of the motor, and overall fan design. These combined factors establish the air moving capacity of a fan. Fan capacity is measured in terms of the cubic feet, and again, this is how CFM (cubic feet per minute is determined.)

CFM and RPM are the two most important things to look for in a fan, so that you are guaranteed correct and effective operation. If you only know the RPM, and not the CFM, or vice versa, you should feel confident in your fan purchase. As long as you know one of the calculations, you are ensured of a well-working fan. However, if you are not satisfied with these calculations, this is not the only criteria one can use for evaluating fan performance.

One of the main qualifications, second to rpm and CFM measurement is noise level or decibel rating, followed by the next qualification of vibration. Look for fan noise levels rated in sones or decibels. Check these if the CFM or RPM still leave you unsettled about your fan choice.

A standard measurement of airflow indicates how many cubic feet of air passes by a stationary point in one minute. The higher the number, the more air is being forced through the system. The volumetric flow rate of a liquid or gas in cubic feet per minute equals the CFM, and one CFM equals approximately 2 liters per second.

Fan manufacturers base their measurements on a standard measurement with clean, dry air at a density of 0.075 pounds mass per cubic foot, barometric pressure at sea level of 29.92 inches of mercury, and a temperature of 70°F. These standard measurements are used to determine SCFM: Standard Cubic Feet Per Minute.

With the use of CFM and RPM, you can make a more educated choice when choosing your home ceiling, exhaust, or table fan, and know what you are getting!

Calculating the CFM of a Fan
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kFhiS...layer_embedded

Electric Cooling Fan CFM Rating Tests
http://www.naxja.org/forum/showthread.php?t=1057920


Electric Fans
The toughest question when choosing an electric is how to pick the right one. There are dozens of electric fans out there and unfortunately no accurate backyard test for fan efficiency, but we've uncovered some handy shortcuts that can help you choose the best fan for your application. As a general rule, straight-blade fans move more air than curved-blade fans, but you'll pay the price in terms of increased noise.


There is no common industry standard for rating electric fans. Most companies use a cfm rating, often expressed in free-flow and not when placed behind a radiator. This makes comparisons of electric fans difficult. Spal publishes its test data on its Web site for each electric fan. Any fan's highest cfm rating occurs with zero static pressure, or with no airflow restriction in front of the fan. Spal expresses this restriction in terms of inches of water. As the restriction increases (with a thicker radiator core, for example), flow volume drops while current flow increases slightly. According to Jason Schmidt at Spal, one rule of thumb is 10 amps of current flow per 1,000 cfm of air. This is not accurate in all cases, but if you find a fan rated at 3,000 cfm that only requires 10 amps, the cfm rating may be optimistic. Spal rates all its fans, and the three we investigated revealed 17 amps for 2,000 cfm, 21 amps for a 2,360-cfm fan, and a third pulling 26 amps at 3,000 cfm, all rated at zero static pressure.


Twin fans can be a plus in tight-clearance situations, since staggering the two fans moves
Two fans usually can cover more radiator surface area than one large fan, which makes the twin-fan systems generally more efficient. Twin-fan performance is also often enhanced by built-in shrouds that pull air in from the entire core surface as opposed to just the area of the radiator covered by the fan. To boil it all down, if you're experiencing overheating difficulties and the rest of the cooling system is optimized, increasing airflow with a pair of smaller fans covering the entire radiator core will generally improve airflow and efficiency.

Aluminum Radiators


Aluminum radiators are nice, but they can be expensive, costing between $245 and $550.These are universal aluminum radiators with inlet and outlet configurations. These radiators are a two-row design, these radiators can be fitted to many different applications.

OEM Thermostat & How It Works


When the engine started cold, the thermostat is closed. The engine coolant / antifreeze does not circulate through the radiator. Instead it returns back into the engine through the by-pass tube. This helps to warm up the engine faster. As soon as the engine temperature reaches the normal range, the thermostat opens and the engine coolant starts circulating through the radiator where it cools down.

If the coolant temperature in the radiator drops too low, for example when driving on a freeway in a cold weather, the thermostat closes again to keep the temperature within operating range.


Racing Thermostat
Racing Thermostat will promote greater cooling efficiency throughout your engine, It will significantly lower high engine temperature produced by modified and upgraded turbo applications, Once the engine is fully warmed up this racing thermostat will open up at a lower temperature than standard thermostats, also allowing the coolant to flow through the engine sooner thus reducing and maintaining cooler engine temperatures.

Racing Thermostat activates at:
Mishimoto 60º C & Spoon sport 71º C & Mugen 68º C

OEM Thermostat activates at 78º C
Note: I am using the OEM on my turbo civic problems free.


OEM Thermo Sensor B
This Thermo sensor is located at the housing of the Thermostat.
This tells the fan control unit when the coolant temp is for Example @ >226*F.AFTER the key has cycled from on to off if the coolant is >226* the condenser fan will run until coolant temp <214*F.


Racing Thermo Sensor B
The Racing Spec fan switch is designed for Honda vehicles. It is designed to start the radiator fan at 80 degrees celcius rather than its normal starting temperature of 93 degrees.
This keeps the engine cooler and avoids Horsepower loss due to heat soak.


Thermo Sensor C
This Thermo sensor is located at the housing of the Thermostat.
This sensor is for the ECT.

Thermo Temp Sending Unit
This little switch is located at the water neck also and is a single prong unit. This switch sends the temp to the gauge cluster.
If this is in-op then you will have no reading on your gauge cluster but fans will still operate as normal.


Cooling-System Tips
While the cooling system may seem simple, consider not only the variables of coolant flow, airflow, and radiator efficiency, but also how other engine systems affect cooling. If the charging system is lame, your electric fan won't spin as fast. If the ignition curve is slow, that will affect cooling. We've assembled a series of tips and tricks that can often make the difference between an overheating monster and a docile street machine that can handle gridlock in 110-degree weather.

*Ignition timing has a direct effect on cooling-system performance. Retarded ignition timing begins the combustion process later in the cycle and makes heat. Initial timing numbers of 12 to 16 degrees and a curve that's all in by 2,500 rpm is a good starting place.

*An electric fan placed on the engine side of the radiator (as a puller) is always more efficient than a pusher fan. However, additional airflow can be created by using a second pusher fan on the front of the radiator.

*Most engines are thermally more efficient at a coolant temperature of 195 to 200 degrees Fahrenheit. Pressure is also a critical function of coolant efficiency. A typical street-car cooling system operates at 15 psi. This pressure also increases the boiling temperature of water. As a rough rule of thumb, for every 1 psi of cooling-system pressure, the boiling point of straight water will rise between 2 and 3 degrees. Water boils at sea level at 212 degrees Fahrenheit, but at 15-psi gauge pressure, water boils at 250 degrees Fahrenheit.




Radiator Analysis - Tech Knowledge
Radiator Analysis Choosing The Right One
Text By Scott Tsuneishi,
During the early '70s, copper/brass radiators were used worldwide due to their superior ability to conduct heat, but weighed three times that of aluminum radiators, were expensive to manufacture, and experienced high failure rates due to corrosion and stress fractures. Aluminum radiators made their way into automobiles during the '80s, as OEMs embraced the idea of a lighter, more cost-effective design that lasted two to four times longer than copper/brass radiators. Today, the OEM standard radiator-using an aluminum core with plastic tanks-can be found in 99 percent of cars driven on the highway. Follow along as we showcase the ins-and-outs of radiators as we cover what to look for and avoid when addressing your cooling system.

Single-Pass Vs. Dual Pass Radiators
There's been much debate into the theories and logic behind dual-pass/double-pass radiators and their benefits over the more commonly used single-pass system. The Koyo dual-pass radiator (pictured) uses their N-FLO technology that welds two partitions half-way through the radiator core, thus splitting the tank into separate chambers. The "N"-shaped water flow pattern is designed to improve radiator efficiency by passing the fluid over the first half of the radiator and then the second half, allowing the core to dissipate heat twice, while maintaining the coolant in the radiator up to three times longer, offering improved cooling. Koyo representative Scott Oshiro explains, "Dual-pass radiators like the N-FLO were designed specifically for known applications where cooling was an issue, such as with drift cars." In cars being pitched sideways down a track, using a dual-pass radiator allows the radiator to cool efficiently, even when ambient air isn't being forced directly into it at all times. Unless a car suffers from previous overheating issues, all three radiator manufactures we contacted recommended using the traditional down-flow or cross-flow single-pass radiator, which presents all the tubes with the highest possible water temperature at once. Dual-pass radiators work efficiently at high speeds in certain race-prepped systems, but do so at a cost of increased load on an engine's water pump, and inefficient low-speed cooling capacity, which can raise pressure and temperature to higher-than-desired levels.


Does size really matter?
A larger radiator allows the core to dissipate heat more effectively, but the tube-and-fin design plays just as important a role in the radiator's ability to keep your engine cool. Mike Small of Koyo Cooling Systems explains that as the water is split into multiple tubes, the heat dissipating "load" is split, similar to an 18-wheeler splitting the cargo load over 18 tires rather than four. Radiators using decreased tube pitch (distance from one tube to another) will lead to a denser-capacity core that increases cooling efficiency, but too dense a core will decrease air travel through the fins, decreasing cooling efficiency. The ideal radiator will have optimized fin-density for maximum heat dissipation. "The 'trick' is getting the right balance of fins and tubes based on all the variables," said Small.


Single Pass Radiator.


Dual Pass Radiator.


Internal corrosion can occur almost anywhere in a radiator. This photo showcases a worst-case scenario where the radiator's tubes are fully plugged from rust and sludge. Leak-inhibiting additives or sealers can cause more harm than good, as metallic deposits in "quick-fix" sealants can, over time, block the cooling passages, thus causing overheating.


Factory radiators are designed to perform well in daily-driven conditions, but commonly fail under strenuous heat cycling and endurance situations. OEM-style radiators using plastic end tanks pressed onto aluminum cores are susceptible to steam erosion and corrosion that can lead to cracking or leaking.


This Fluidyne radiator cut-away shows how its internal cooling tubes are designed flat to increase capacity and surface area to aid in efficient cooling. These larger-sized cooling tubes, found on aluminum aftermarket radiators, are less susceptible to corroding and clogging. They use a one- to two-inch or dual one-inch diameter tube (depending on manufacturer specs), compared to a 0.5-inch tube for most OE copper/brass applications. Larger tubing wall thickness helps eliminate ballooning of the core of factory radiators, which is more commonly found on forced induction vehicles experiencing high water pressure.


Here we see the dissection of a Koyo R-Series core utilizing a tube pitch of 9.5 mm, representing the peak-to-peak distance between each tube. Notice the striated louvers on each fin? These work as effective heat sinks to catch air as it enters the core to maximize cooling.


A close-up of this ARC core reveals the smaller, slotted fin design, allowing for air to move faster through the unit, while providing a large cooling surface area for efficiency. ARC Japan says that cooling efficiency does not depend on the thickness of the radiator, but rather the design of the fins and the difference in fin pitch, as shown on this EVO IX radiator using a 1.3-inch-thick core-the same width as the factory radiator.


Radiator Analysis Koyo Vs Oem Graph




Link below
http://www.importtuner.com/tech/impp...tor_analysis/#

So guy's reason for adding this in to let you no what Radiator is Good To go for.


Do Cooler Engines Make More Power? - Fact Or Fiction
Text By Luke Munnell

The Claim: Cooler engines make more power.
We all know that heat is the enemy of performance in the automotive realm. Rampant engine heat increases the propensity for pre-ignition (detonation) that can altogether destroy engines in severe cases, or trigger knock sensors to pull timing and decrease power in mild cases. And heat-soaked induction components (intakes, intercoolers, and piping) mean hotter, less dense intake charges and less power. Weekend drag racers will tell you: hotter engines run slower. Shut your car off in staging lanes, pop its hood, and lay bags of ice on intakes, intake manifolds, intercoolers, carburetors, and the like for peak performance



But could this be doing more harm than good? You probably know that an ice-cold engine won’t make peak power, either. There are two reasons for this: Heat is energy, and when a significant amount of that energy generated during combustion goes toward heating cold engines, less of it can be directed toward pushing pistons down (or rotors around) to make power. That, and when engines are cold, oil is cold and therefore more viscous, so engine manufacturers and tuners will usually devise a less powerful “cold tune” map that deters the driver from beating on his engine in this state. Engineers and tuners just might tell you that hotter engines actually make more power.

So who’s right, what’s the best operating temperature for engines, and what’s the best way to maximize performance during race day? To find the answers we rounded up the 330whp, turbocharged LS/VTEC-powered ’92 Civic hatch of Tokyo Auto lead tech Steve Ruiz, and headed over to SoCal street/drag tuning authority Carlos “Bubba” Ocegueda’s facility: Do It Dyno in Signal Hill, CA.



True to street form, our test car was driven nearly 45 miles to the dyno. It arrived hot and was shut off and allowed to cool for about two hours while Do It accommodated a turbocharged 13B-powered sandrail (video on importtuner.com). Once strapped down to the dyno, the Civic’s Hondata engine management system logged engine coolant and intake air temperatures while we verified radiant temperatures at the intake manifold, charge piping, intercooler, radiator, and block after three full throttle, four-gear pulls—simulating quarter-mile blasts—at four different stages testing four different operating temperatures and/or cooling techniques:

Test #1: Cold

Temperature and power testing commenced after the car had been shut off and was allowed to cool for two hours—its engine and components weren’t completely as cool as ambient temperatures, but a lot cooler than their normal operating range.



Engine coolant temperature: 149° F
Intake air temperature: 95° F
Intake manifold radiant heat: 88° F
Engine block radiant heat: 104.8° F
Intercooler radiant heat: 63.8° F
Charge piping radiant heat: 63.7° F

Horsepower: 329.7



Test #2: Hot

Temperature and power testing commenced after the engine had reached full operating temperature via an extended drive cycle with the car’s hood closed on the dyno, simulating back-to-back quarter-mile passes, or making a pass immediately after the drive in.



Engine coolant temperature: 204° F
Intake air temperature: 112° F
Intake manifold radiant heat: 114.0° F
Engine block radiant heat: 203.0° F
Intercooler radiant heat: 85.5° F
Charge piping radiant heat: 114.9° F

Horsepower: 289.1


Test #3: Warm Engine, Cold Components

Temperature and power testing commenced again after the engine had idled to its regular temperature for 30 minutes with the hood up, after ice bags had been placed on the intake manifold and intercooler piping, and the intercooler cooled with compressed CO2 immediately before testing, simulating the recipe many drag racers would suggest for optimizing the performance of a street car: let its engine idle to its natural temperature, and get those intake components ice-cold for as dense an intake charge as possible.



Engine coolant temperature: 190.5° F
Intake air temperature: 97° F
Intake manifold radiant heat: 94.5° F
Engine block radiant heat: 193.3° F
Intercooler radiant heat: 61.9° F
Charge piping radiant heat: 75.4° F

Horsepower: 332.8


Test #4: Cool Engine, Cold Components

Temperature and power testing finished after the car had been allowed to cool for 30 minutes with the engine off, hood up, ice bags placed on the intake manifold and intercooler piping, but with the intercooler only ice-cooled to simulated another alternative: Ice everything down the old-school way (with no intercooler spray), and kill the engine to let it cool off slightly for a little added shteez.



Engine coolant temperature: 187.6° F
Intake air temperature: 97° F
Intake manifold radiant heat: 83.6° F
Engine block radiant heat: 186° F
Intercooler radiant heat: 63.8° F
Charge piping radiant heat: 74.4° F

Horsepower: 320.1



The Verdict: Fiction
Our test car’s engine churned out the most power right where Bubba said it would: with its engine at its normal operating temperature—not too hot or too cold—and its intake components as cool as can be. But excluding the hottest run, the amount of power lost or gained was marginal. “Freezing the intercooler with a compressed gas like nitrous oxide or CO2 will make the biggest difference,” he advises, flat out. “Ice bags really don’t do anything but leak water on the track and make everyone slower,” he adds. “Which might keep you in the stands for the rest of the night.”

Link Below
http://www.importtuner.com/tech/impp...ke_more_power/

Oil Cooler Basics

Design and importance of Oil Coolers
Contributed By: Enginebasics.com



To put it as simply as I can, an oil cooler is basically a radiator with oil running through it instead of water. Oil coolers are an important tool in keeping any well running motor continually running well even when pushed to the limit. Maintaining a proper oil temperature is important not only to keep the oil at its proper lubricating state, but also to aid the radiator in keeping the motor cool.

When surrounded by Porsche owners, sometimes we hear of “the good ole air cooled days” of Porsche motors. I know that even I thought this was incredible that these high performance motors could stay cool with no water-cooling, but just air, but the name hides the real story. The reality is that these motors ran upwards of 12 quarts of oil, some even as much as 16 quarts, with very large oil coolers. In reality these motors should have been called oil-cooled motors instead of air-cooled. This goes to show us how important an oil cooler can be to cooling a car.

Design of an Oil Cooler

Oil coolers come in many sizes just like radiators. Choosing a proper size is based on a few factors:

1. The capacity of oil in the system

2. The power output of the motor

3. The amount of air flow and space for the cooler

4. The size of the radiator

Each of the following above will play a key roll in deciding the size of oil cooler you will need for your car. As a basic rule of thumb, most drivers will add as big of an oil cooler as can fit in a space that receives good airflow, and then add a thermostat so that the oil can be kept at a proper temperature.

The oil cooler is designed to come in a one pass, two pass, or even triple pass design. This means the amount of times the oil will pass across the length of the cooler before it is aloud to exit. The idea being that the more passes the oil makes across the cooling front, the more heat the oil will be able to dissipate. Another important part of the design is inlet and outlet size. Be sure to choose a size that will not be too small and restrictive, as this will cause a drop in oil pressure. Most find that -8an or -10 an size fittings are sufficient. Also be sure to try and minimize length and number of bends in the oil lines as your run them to the coolers location.


Installation of an Oil Cooler

The best place to install an Oil Cooler is where it can receive a maximum amount of airflow, there by making the cooler as efficient as it can be. Most users know this, but I feel it needed to be stated anyway. Next comes running the lines to the cooler from the motor. The best place to tap into the oil supply system is at the oil filter. This is because the filter is just after the oil pump so the oil supply will have adequate pressure to move through the lines and cooler efficiently. Also this gives the oil cooler the opportunity to cool the oil before it is used by the engine, thereby making sure every part of the motor receives cooled oil at the proper temperature. Two of the best methods to adding the oil cooler lines to this part of the motor is
by either a:


1. A sandwich plate



2. Filter Relocation Kit

1. With a sandwich plate you are basically putting a piece of metal with an input and output barb for the oil cooler, that is sandwiched between the block and the oil filter.


This is an easy and great way to add the outputs you need when adding the oil cooler if you have the space to add a sandwich plate on the block.

2. A Filter Relocation Kit relocates the filter to another area. So why do we care about relocating a filter when we are talking about an oil cooler? With a relocation kit you use an adapter to screw in where the oil filter was on the block to run lines to another location where the filter will be. What this does though is gives us output lines, so that instead of running right to the oil filter, we can run to an oil cooler first and then to the filter and back to the block.

The Benefits



A car motor is happiest when it has good, clean, lubricating oil running through it. To do this oil wants to be between 180-210 degrees Fahrenheit. If the oil is to hot, it will start to break down and separate causing the oil to thin, and the oil pressure to drop to dangerous levels. Having oil that is to cold can be damaging as well since the oil will not be up to temperature and not at its proper viscosity level. The best solution is to add a thermostat controlled oil cooler. What the thermostat does is keep the oil cooler closed, and out of the loop, so that oil can be quickly brought up to temperature. Then the cooler is variably opened to maintain proper oil temperatures. If you opt to not install an oil cooler thermostat, just be sure to warm your car up a little before driving to give the oil time to heat up to a proper level.

You should now understand the basics of an oil cooler, and be able to install one on your car. If you have any questions or comments about this or other articles found here on enginebasics.com, be sure to contact us.

As mentions by Jeff Evans said," Anyone with a FWD turbo Honda NEEDS the Evans Tuning Oil Cooler Kit. We were able to lower coolant 20-30 degrees and keep oil temps around 160-170 degrees"


Link Below
http://www.enginebasics.com/Engine%2...%20basics.html


Good link
http://www.barsleaks.net/faq.html

In The End I Love to hear & share knowledge with you all an take care.

Last edited by hussain-vtec; 07-16-2012 at 04:15 AM. Reason: Oil Coolers
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Old 06-05-2012, 08:08 AM   #2
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Default Re: ***High-Performance Cooling System***

Good write up.. way to go
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Old 06-05-2012, 08:50 AM   #3
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Default Re: ***High-Performance Cooling System***

Sticky??
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Old 06-05-2012, 10:48 PM   #4
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Default Re: ***High-Performance Cooling System***

Thanks Guys.

I am thinking of Perma-Cool Standard Electric Fans in diffident sizes but the CFM's and AMP's Draw are Some bad *** with reasonable prices from Summit racing.

I think i will get this one Perma-Cool 19120
Electric Fan, Single, 10 in. Diameter, Reversible, 2,350 cfm, Black, Plastic, Kit.

Maximum Fan CFM 2,350 cfm
Fan Diameter (in) 8.500 in.
Height (in) 11.000 in.
Width (in) 10.000 in.
Thickness (in) 2.250 in.
Number of Blades 10 blades
Maximum Fan RPM 3,000 rpm
Blade Material Plastic
Amp Draw 4.7 amps

For example Guy's important thing to be consider OEM Fan relay Located In the fuse box,
Our Civic Relays are 20 amp, and when i am installing a two Perma-Cool fan i should change the relay to 30 amp, as a rule of thump if you changing your fan just check amps draw & check manufacturer specifications.

For my case i need only one fan so i don't have to change the Oem relay only i have to get a
30 Amp fuse for start up-protection.

link below
http://www.summitracing.com/search/B.../?autoview=SKU

PDF File
http://www.perma-cool.com/catalog.pdf

Last edited by hussain-vtec; 06-06-2012 at 12:23 AM.
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Old 06-06-2012, 12:22 AM   #5
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Default Re: ***High-Performance Cooling System***

How To Solve An Engine Overheat Condition

Here is A Video's from the famous guy.
EricTheCarGuy

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hUzOT...ure=plpp_video


How To Bleed A Cooling System
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zUpXg...feature=relmfu

Enjoy

Last edited by hussain-vtec; 06-07-2012 at 10:39 PM. Reason: How To Bleed A Cooling System added
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Old 06-06-2012, 01:27 PM   #6
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Default Re: ***High-Performance Cooling System***

pump For coiling your performance edited.
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Old 06-07-2012, 12:32 PM   #7
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Default Re: ***High-Performance Cooling System***

good read, great info!!
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Old 06-07-2012, 12:44 PM   #8
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Default Re: ***High-Performance Cooling System***

Added to the Forced Induction FAQ. Thanks for your contribution
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Old 06-07-2012, 06:12 PM   #9
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Default Re: ***High-Performance Cooling System***

OP
im in the market for a replacement fan for my dc2. i have a single core radiator and i was looking into the SPAL fan but since you presented the Perma fan which has a higher CFM im now interested with this. question, will i have to change my fan amp to accommodated this type of fan?

im interested in this fan to be exact
http://www.summitracing.com/parts/PRM-19122/
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Old 06-07-2012, 09:53 PM   #10
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Default Re: ***High-Performance Cooling System***

Quote:
Originally Posted by justYncredible View Post
OP
im in the market for a replacement fan for my dc2. i have a single core radiator and i was looking into the SPAL fan but since you presented the Perma fan which has a higher CFM im now interested with this. question, will i have to change my fan amp to accommodated this type of fan?

im interested in this fan to be exact
http://www.summitracing.com/parts/PRM-19122/
Way to go, good choice.

A.
All perma fan's need a 30 Amp fuse for start up-protection.

Instructions simply Remove the cooling fan yellow 20 amp fuse from your hood fuse box an replace it with a 30 amp fuse.





Tip Note:


Q.
Is a 20 amp or 30 amp fuse better protection against high current?


A.
The problem with the question is the part not stated.
What is the amprage rating of the equipment and the branch wiring that was installed to provide the necessary power?
In other words, if the equipment is meant to draw 25 amps and the wire size is #10 gage, then by all means a 30 amp fuse is better, though if you are talking fuses and not breakers, then by all means install a 25 amp fuse.
However, if the wire size is #12 gage and the unit only draws 15 amps, putting a 30 amp fuse in could cause a total melt down of the system and the wiring and eventually could cause a fire. This is the reason why most insurance companies would rather see breakers installed then the removable fuses.

A moran who is tired of changing fuses because they keep blowing will rationalize that putting in a larger amprage fuse will cause them less work, but they fail to think about the safety aspect of their action. They are the ones we see on the late night news watching their homes burn to the ground and not understanding why their toaster oven went on the blink and caused this and they will, of course, have to sue this toaster oven company because it was "their" fault. A larger fuse should NEVER be installed on a system that demands a lower amprage fuse or breaker if the correct size devices are not in place.


Good luck with the fan and please post your results an don't forget to fabricate a shrouds for maximum cooling perfection.

Last edited by hussain-vtec; 06-07-2012 at 10:25 PM.
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Old 06-07-2012, 09:58 PM   #11
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Default Re: ***High-Performance Cooling System***

Quote:
Originally Posted by turboda4dr View Post
good read, great info!!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Schister66 View Post
Added to the Forced Induction FAQ. Thanks for your contribution
Thanks Guy's
Improving our knowledge for better future.
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Old 06-08-2012, 09:12 AM   #12
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Default Re: ***High-Performance Cooling System***

Quote:
Originally Posted by hussain-vtec View Post
Way to go, good choice.

A.
All perma fan's need a 30 Amp fuse for start up-protection.

Instructions simply Remove the cooling fan yellow 20 amp fuse from your hood fuse box an replace it with a 30 amp fuse.





Tip Note:


Q.
Is a 20 amp or 30 amp fuse better protection against high current?


A.
The problem with the question is the part not stated.
What is the amprage rating of the equipment and the branch wiring that was installed to provide the necessary power?
In other words, if the equipment is meant to draw 25 amps and the wire size is #10 gage, then by all means a 30 amp fuse is better, though if you are talking fuses and not breakers, then by all means install a 25 amp fuse.
However, if the wire size is #12 gage and the unit only draws 15 amps, putting a 30 amp fuse in could cause a total melt down of the system and the wiring and eventually could cause a fire. This is the reason why most insurance companies would rather see breakers installed then the removable fuses.

A moran who is tired of changing fuses because they keep blowing will rationalize that putting in a larger amprage fuse will cause them less work, but they fail to think about the safety aspect of their action. They are the ones we see on the late night news watching their homes burn to the ground and not understanding why their toaster oven went on the blink and caused this and they will, of course, have to sue this toaster oven company because it was "their" fault. A larger fuse should NEVER be installed on a system that demands a lower amprage fuse or breaker if the correct size devices are not in place.


Good luck with the fan and please post your results an don't forget to fabricate a shrouds for maximum cooling perfection.

Thank you for the important information. That little 20A will be replaced with a 30A when the times for the new fan. As for the shroud...I'm already ahead of you







Homemade made out a 13x13x1 cake pan!
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Old 06-08-2012, 09:53 AM   #13
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Default Re: ***High-Performance Cooling System***

great info!!!
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Old 06-09-2012, 02:02 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by justYncredible View Post
Thank you for the important information. That little 20A will be replaced with a 30A when the times for the new fan. As for the shroud...I'm already ahead of you

Homemade made out a 13x13x1 cake pan!
Your Welcome.

Keep the progress dude an that's Cool shroud.


Quote:
Originally Posted by chuwi_pty View Post
great info!!!
Thank's and all H-T Members are worth to get some knowledge back,
with out you guy's i will not reach this level.
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Old 06-09-2012, 02:06 AM   #15
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Default Re: ***High-Performance Cooling System***

Opinions on Evans Waterless NPG Coolant? I have used in a few cars with great success, have to modify the radiator cap though.
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Old 06-09-2012, 02:59 AM   #16
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Quote:
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Opinions on Evans Waterless NPG Coolant? I have used in a few cars with great success, have to modify the radiator cap though.
OK First thing, it won't decrease the normal operating temp. It just raises the safe temp limit higher than a water based coolant can handle without boiling.

Second Thing What it would do is signifigantly lower the hot spots on the head that result from a normal water based coolant boiling when running above the normal operating temps.

Third thing, if you're running a copper/brass radiator with the small 3/8" tubes for the cores there may be a small increase in coolant temps over the water-based coolants (5-10 degress) because the Evans coolant is slightly thicker than a water-based coolant and it doesn't flow through the small cores as well. It works great in the newer aluminum radiators because they use the high-flow 1" or bigger tubes.

Link's Below for your request.

Evans Cooling Waterless NPG Coolant thread
http://www.ttora.com/forum/showthrea...ighlight=Evans

Instruction manual
http://www.hrpworld.com/client_image...ader/683_4.pdf
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Old 06-12-2012, 12:07 AM   #17
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Default Re: ***High-Performance Cooling System***

Guy's any one have a good Cooling systems, just post your setups shroud experience.
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Old 06-15-2012, 03:13 AM   #18
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Default Re: ***High-Performance Cooling System***

Perma 12in cooling fan ordered!
Should have it sometime next week I'll post my experience my fan I have now and this replacement fan
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Old 06-15-2012, 07:01 AM   #19
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Default Re: ***High-Performance Cooling System***

Quote:
Originally Posted by justYncredible View Post
Perma 12in cooling fan ordered!
Should have it sometime next week I'll post my experience my fan I have now and this replacement fan
Wish you the best.
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Old 06-15-2012, 07:25 AM   #20
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Default Re: ***High-Performance Cooling System***

Bump
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Old 06-19-2012, 03:29 PM   #21
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Default Re: ***High-Performance Cooling System***

in conjunction of Juneteeth, i received my perma cooling fan from submit racing. installation was a straight replacement from my current fan. from my previous datalog i was seeing temps up near the 224-234 range if my memory serves me right and this was taken at night. the highest i received with this fan was 216 BUT the temp outside with an overcast (expecting rains) was 93 degrees and i live in Texas. this fan is much quieter than my local parts store fan, i think its mainly because the blades are straight and not swirled. another thing im going to do, even though i dont want to, is to remove my front plate. currently the plate is offset to the passenger side and im pretty sure its blocking straight airflow to the radiator which would help decrease temps. ill run the vehicle again to see if removing the front plate helped any. stay tuned!!
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Old 06-20-2012, 01:49 AM   #22
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Default Re: ***High-Performance Cooling System***

I don't have a lot of experience with the spal fans but every time I see someone with a cheap fan (with or without shroud) pusing their cooling system hard they have cooling issues. Many times when an OEM fan fits switching back to OEM the problems go away.

Has anyone found an aftermarket fan that actually out performs an OE fan?
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Old 06-20-2012, 02:22 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by justYncredible View Post
in conjunction of Juneteeth, i received my perma cooling fan from submit racing. installation was a straight replacement from my current fan. from my previous datalog i was seeing temps up near the 224-234 range if my memory serves me right and this was taken at night. the highest i received with this fan was 216 BUT the temp outside with an overcast (expecting rains) was 93 degrees and i live in Texas. this fan is much quieter than my local parts store fan, i think its mainly because the blades are straight and not swirled. another thing im going to do, even though i dont want to, is to remove my front plate. currently the plate is offset to the passenger side and im pretty sure its blocking straight airflow to the radiator which would help decrease temps. ill run the vehicle again to see if removing the front plate helped any. stay tuned!!
That is Good news you lose 18F Degrees just by changing the fan, Congrats.

One test you can do is do a Wot third gear pull for N/A and forth gear pull for F/I and keep your eyes one ECT Temp datalog then let us no the ECT's Temps and don't forget the crusing Temps as well, Before you remove front plate and after you remove it.

The catch here is we need to find things that help ECT to be Cooled down.

And what is your A/F ratio at idle and crusing and @ wot as well consult your Tuner about it and ask he's advice.

Check your Radiator Cap Pressure Rating.
Read the (Radiator Cap Holds Very Important Role In Your Car) for your reference.

Q.what ecu you are running?
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Old 06-20-2012, 02:29 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natural Aspirations View Post
I don't have a lot of experience with the spal fans but every time I see someone with a cheap fan (with or without shroud) pusing their cooling system hard they have cooling issues. Many times when an OEM fan fits switching back to OEM the problems go away.

Has anyone found an aftermarket fan that actually out performs an OE fan?
Spal 13" fan Thread Good info is there but the thing with 13'' fans is the high amp's draw and the noise and the space.
https://honda-tech.com/forums/forced-induction-16/spal-13%22-fan-2371027/

Stay tuned for progresses.
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Old 06-20-2012, 09:32 AM   #25
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Default Re: ***High-Performance Cooling System***

Wow, I'm surprised no one has posted anything about the benefits of a tucked radiator?I have a ramhorn manifold and a turbo with water lines my radiator has a hard time keeping up in the summer. I currently have a koyo radiator w/shroud and 13in spal fan but thinking about getting rid of that in flavor of all in fab tucked radiator combo.
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